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Chemotherapy FAQs

Q. Will I lose my hair?
A. Some chemotherapy drugs do cause hair loss. Hair loss typically occurs within the first two weeks of treatment, and the hair grows back once treatment has ended. Please talk to your doctor about the side effects you might experience based on the specific drugs used in your treatment.

Q. Will I get nauseated? 
A. Some chemotherapy drugs will cause you to become nauseated. When receiving these drugs, normally you will be given anti-nausea medication before treatment begins.

Q. Is it safe to be around other people while receiving chemotherapy treatments?
A. In general, it is safe to be around people when you’re being treated with chemotherapy. However, the drugs used in chemotherapy are very strong in order to kill the cancer cells in your body. They are processed and removed from your body in about two days through your urine and stool. As a result, you should take special precautions in the 48 hours after each chemotherapy session so that people do not come in contact with your bodily fluids. Please talk to your doctor for more information.

Q. How long will my treatment session last?
A. Each treatment plan is unique including the length of time of each chemotherapy session.

Q. Do I have to come every day?
A. This depends upon your specific treatment plan. You may receive chemotherapy daily, weekly or even just once a month. Usually chemotherapy is given in cycles with periods of rest between periods of treatment to allow your body to rest and heal between cycles.

Q. How tired will I be?
A. Fatigue is a common side effect of chemotherapy medication, but most people are able to continue with their daily activities.

Q. What are some of the common side effects to chemotherapy?
A. Most people experience fatigue while undergoing chemotherapy. Depending on the medicine used, some people lose their hair and experience nausea. You may also have an increased risk of catching infections.

Q. Can I drive myself?
A. Most patients are able to drive themselves to treatment, but check with your physician to make sure it is safe for your particular case.

Q. Can I bring someone along with me for support?
A Yes, we encourage this.

Q. Does chemotherapy hurt?
A. Besides the initial discomfort of the needle stick for an IV or injection, a chemotherapy session is not painful.

Q. Will I have to wait long before getting an appointment to see the doctor?
A. No. Most new patients are able to schedule an appointment within one week of calling.